Archive for the ‘Community’ Category

in.gredients 4th Anniversary Party on Aug. 6th

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Join us in celebrating four years of zero waste, local food, and community at our free family-friendly 4th Anniversary Party on Saturday, August 6 from 6-9PM.

There will be live music by The Stovetop Rangers and Devin James Fry,KTonic Kombucha snowcones, live screen printing by Fine Southern Gentlemen, face painting by Sparklefingers Body Art, a photo booth, giant jenga with Workers Defense Project and more. In collaboration withJuiceLand and Johnson’s Backyard Garden, Hops and Grain will be brewing their signature small-batch Watermelon Brown Ale, Common Denominator. Austin-based companies Zhi Tea, Cat Spring Tea, Kosmic Kombucha, Third Coast Coffee Roasting Company, Boulanger Fermentations, Delysia Chocolatier, Fortitude Provisions and Joe’s Organics will join the party with samples and stories about their history with in.gredients and their work to support the store’s mission.

A portion of the proceeds from our 4th Anniversary Party will be donated to our incredible non-profit Community Partner, Workers Defense Project, an Austin-based organization that advocates for marginalized workers.

Join in.gredients in celebrating four years of slinging local groceries and pouring local pints with the incredible community that has grown around its mission. RSVP here.

Written by laureneatyourvegetables

July 25, 2016 at 1:20 pm

9th Annual Bug Eating Festival July 13th!

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Little Herds Celebrates Eating Insects and a Sustainable Future of Food at the 9th Annual Bug Eating Festival Part II on Wednesday, July 13th

For the second year in a row, in.gredients is hosting the Bug (Eating) Festival – a celebration of entomophagy and the future of food organized by Little Herds, an Austin non-profit working to promote the use of insects for food and feed as an environmentally sound and economically viable source of nutrition.

A large crowd of local bug-enthusiasts gathered at in.gredients for Part I of the 9th Annual Bug (Eating) Festival on Saturday, June 4 to sample insect-infused treats, listen to live music by Josh Buckley and learn more about the role of bugs in our food system. 

“It went great; we probably had 200 people there,” Little Herds President Robert Nathan Allen said. “We had booths for PEAS, Delysia Chocolatier, Slow Food Austin, Aketta, and Crickers Crackers. There was a kids’ activities table and a bunch of different treats like cricket rice krispie treats and cricket oatmeal cookies. Chef Rick Lopez from La Condesa did a cooking demonstration of how to make chapulines salsa.”

Due to the severe weather conditions during Part I of the 9th Annual Bug Eating Festival, Little Herds is holding a second Bug Eating Festival this year on Wednesday, July 13 from 5-9PM at in.gredients. The 9th Annual Bug Eating Festival Part II is an opportunity for insect-novices to taste bugs for the first time and for entomophagy enthusiasts like RNA to gather and share what they love about insects as a food of the future.

RNA’s initial interest in insect eating was sparked by a video on entomophagy that was sent to him as a joke, “I took it way too seriously,” he said. A year later RNA had gathered together a group of friends who were interested in eating bugs and raising awareness of the environmental and nutritional benefits of insects as an alternative protein source. Within six months, by December 2013, Little Herds had become a 501c3 non-profit committed to edible insect education.

“We should be thinking about our food before it hits our plate,” RNA said. “Little Herds’ mission is to educate our community about the benefits of eating insects – it addresses the broader questions of how we fix our broken food system. We are interested in insects as food and as livestock feed, and we are focused on our local community and global community. Austin was the perfect birthplace for Little Herds; there are a lot of cultural influences on our food scene. Austin already has a big paleo community, a big gluten-free community – there are a lot of people who want to keep it weird when it comes to what we eat here.”

LH Feed&H2O Infographic

Raising insects requires significantly less resources – water, space and feed – than the production of other forms of livestock. When RNA learned of the environmental sustainability and nutrient content of edible insects, he began experimenting with cricket flour. He brought one of his first batches of cricket cookies to the 5th Annual Bug Eating Festival.

“The festival was founded by Marjory Wildcraft. She started nine years ago with some friends and families who wanted to try bugs for the first time. They had such a blast they did it again, and more people showed up the next year, and it grew,” RNA said. “I got involved with this idea at the 5th Annual Bug Eating Festival; I brought some cricket flour cookies I baked and just fell in love with the idea. Since then I’ve helped organize the festival. Originally it was a way to get people together to try bugs, and now it’s grown as a way to see insects as a resource and to celebrate all the good work that’s happening in Austin around food and sustainability.”

Little Herds has gathered together a group of local bakers and chefs – Chef Rick Lopez from La Condesa, Aketta Cricket Flour, Crickers and Delysia Chocolatier – to bring insect-enriched treats to Part II of the 9th Annual Bug Eating Festival on Wednesday, July 13 for curious eaters to try. Taste the future of food and sustainable protein in the form of gourmet cricket cookies and chocolates, spiced mealworms and cricket salsa.

“One of the great things about edible insects is that if you don’t want to see them, you don’t have to – you can grind them up into flours,” RNA said. “It’s not a one-to-one replacement of regular flour, but you can sub in a portion of the flour in recipes, and you’ll still get that additional protein, iron and calcium that weren’t there before. Crickets have really good omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids; they have fiber. It’s just mind-blowing how healthy they are, and we’ve just been missing out on it.”


Since Little Herd’s inception in June 2013, they have focused on educating children about entomophagy and getting kids excited to eat bugs. “We have educator kits designed to be taught at schools around Austin that can be catered to any age group,” RNA said. “If we get 1% of kids in Austin to eat insects, we can show how much water is saved and how much greenhouse gas is saved from just a small number people.” Part II of the 9th Annual Bug (Eating) Festival will feature even more activities for kids to learn about the benefits of bugs and how to eat them.

“Parents know it’s nutritious and environmentally beneficial, and kids don’t have built-in taboos,” RNA said. “Trends change throughout history. We’re trying to change the mentality that insects are gross food.”

Little Herds is part of a larger movement to repopularize eating insects as a sustainable protein alternative. Although entomophagy is practiced throughout the world in countries like Mexico, the idea is relatively new in the United States.

“It’s a cultural taboo that’s built up over time for a variety of reasons. As our ancestors moved up north from the equator and bugs got smaller, people stopped eating insects. Due to agriculture, bugs weren’t needed as a food supply,” RNA said. “There are a lot of places where eating insects is traditional, but for younger generations it’s starting to be seen as something your grandmother did. If we make eating insects part of our modern food culture it won’t have that effect. In Mexico, eating insects is still celebrated as a traditional food. There are restaurants throughout the country that serve traditional Oaxacan chapulines.”


Little Herds has three “core principles” it recommends to anyone interested in trying insects for the first time: be safe, be kind (to other eaters, insects and the planet) and be curious.

“It’s fun to surprise people but we want to make sure people are safe; if you have a shellfish allergy you may be allergic to insects,” RNA said. “If someone doesn’t want to try, that’s okay. Everyone has a food they don’t like, and they don’t need someone bullying them about it.”

Little Herds works to promote ethical insect farming that does not disturb local ecosystems. Insects can be safely and humanely harvested through freezing, “lowering their temperature like they would hibernate in the wild.”

“Be kind to the animals; insects are living creatures and sentient beings,” RNA said. “We are not saying go in your backyard and try bugs; you don’t know where those are from. If you harvest bugs from the wild they may have parasites or your neighbor may spray pesticides. Part of being safe is knowing where your food comes from – you should want to know where your food is grown and the way it’s processed. You want to know that it’s safe for animals.”

This summer, Little Herds launched a crowdfunding campaign through Barnraiser to expand their programs in Austin and abroad. Rewards for donating include a jar of Cricket Bolognese Pasta Sauce, a grow-your-own mealworms kit (that comes equipped with a mealworm cookbook and farm) and a cricket-chocolate making class with Delysia Chocolatier – make sure to donate and claim your reward before their crowdfunding deadline of midnight Friday, July 15.

“The first day we received an anonymous matching donation for up to $4000 if we reached our first goal by the following Saturday. The community rallied, and we hit our goal by Friday,” RNA said. “We have some really great stretch goals that are going to be impactful for the local Austin community.”

Little Herds is still working to meet their third fundraising goal of reaching $25,000, which will allow them to host the second ever “Eating Insects” conference in the U.S. next year in Austin. RNA attended “Eating Insects Detroit,” the first conference in the U.S. devoted to insects for food and feed, and came back inspired to do the same in Austin.

“The conference gave me a huge injection of energy and ideas,” RNA said. “Over 150 international business founders joined the conference along with insect farmers and experts leading research looking at the psychology and marketing of eating insects. There were film screenings, a pop-up insect dinner and a food truck-serving insects. The conference was a snapshot of what people are doing all around the world, and how this can apply to Austin. We were just blown away by how this conference went for its first year; bringing it to Austin next year just makes so much sense. We can make it coincide with the 10th Annual Bug Eating Festival.”

Similar to Part I of the 9th Annual Bug (Eating) Festival, Part II will have an Ento Raffle benefitting Little Herds Barnraiser campaign with insect cookbooks, edible insect t-shirts and tote bags, and baking ingredients like cricket flour and Delysia chocolate. The event is open to the public and entrance costs a suggested donation of $10 to Little Herds (kids are free!) – purchase tickets in advance online or at the door.

First time trying insects? Little Herds encourages people to check out their website for resources on how to eat insects safely.

‘I’m in’ with Stephanie Ciancio from San Fransisco’s Nesting So Hard

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Stephanie Ciancio lives in San Fransisco but insists on taking a trip to in.gredients every time she visits her best friend in Austin. Stephanie’s commitment to living a zero waste lifestyle and changing how she shops has led her to start Nesting So Hard, a service that helps people reorganize their kitchens and commit to zero waste habits.

in: How did you hear about in.gredients?

SC: I think maybe Pinterest or Facebook, it was something that friends of mine shared. My best friend Suzanne lives in Austin, when I came here I asked her, “Please take me to this place!” That was a couple years ago, and when I’m back in town I’m like, “Let’s go to in.gredients again!”

in: So you always come to in.gredients when you’re in Austin?

SC: Yeah!

in: What do you like about in.gredients?

SC: I love that it’s a cute little shop that helps people buy exactly what they need and not what they don’t – which is the food that you eat and not necessarily a bunch of extra packaging.

in: Do you try to live a zero-waste lifestyle?

SC: I’m a little obsessive about it. My husband is very understanding. I won’t actually throw away clear plastic. I collect it and take it to the one place it can be recycled; so I try not to get it in the first place. We live in San Francisco, and we compost. And I miss composting when I travel. I had to go on a restricted diet for my digestive health, and I started cooking a lot. And that’s when I got into shopping for bulk foods like quinoa and millet. I get a farm subscription for the produce. It’s a fun thing to play at, to get to the zero waste lifestyle. I like to approach it like a game, like how do we get more of what we want and less of what we don’t want rather than demonizing anything. I grew up shopping at Publix, but it’s so much more fun to shop at a pretty place that approaches food from a different angle and has farm relationships and local sourcing.

in: What is your advice for people looking to live a zero waste lifestyle?

SC: That’s a great question because that’s what I’ve just started doing as a service. I help people makeover their kitchens. And the starting point is, what do you like to cook? What do you like to eat – can you cook that? What ingredients do you use a lot of? And how can you streamline getting ahold of those ingredients, whether it’s a CSA delivery or having a system of containers that you always have. It’s so great to know that we can eat most of our meals at home and that most of what we need can be purchased in bulk. I had a commitment to my health that had me cook and eat in a different way. I no longer went to the grocery store when I remembered, it was part of my lifestyle to procure the food that I prepare and eat. You can create a system where you have containers in your car trunk. Or you can create a system where you have a bag of containers ready to go and you create a shopping list, and when you realize there are a lot of things on your list you grab the bag and you go. For me it was a progression. I still buy things I wasn’t planning on buying. But if you look back 5 or 10 years ago, no one every brought their bags, and now it’s like “Oh I forgot my bags this time.” So there’s been a shift already.

in: What’s the name of your business?

SC: Nesting So Hard. I do one-day kitchen makeovers, and I focus on using Mason jars and getting people really acquainted and familiarized and falling in love with their local bulk grocer.

Read more about Nesting So Hard on Stephanie’s blog


Photo by Suzanne Pressman, Pressman Studio

Written by laureneatyourvegetables

June 28, 2016 at 2:37 pm

Garden Volunteer Day 6/18

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Interested in getting your hands dirty and learning how to garden? Join us for our Garden Volunteer day this Saturday, 6/18 from 9-11:30AM! Email Josh at to sign up.

Written by laureneatyourvegetables

June 14, 2016 at 4:39 pm

Fall 2015 Community Partner Vote

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Did you know that every time you reuse a container at in.gredients, we donate 5 cents to our non-profit community partner? We also donate 1% of our sales every First Friday (read: Block Party!) of the month.

For the past six months we’ve been happily partnered with Guide Dogs of Texas, a non-profit organization committed to providing the best guide dogs for visually impaired Texans.  After a great 6 months of supporting one another, it’s time to select our next partner!

From a large pool of wonderful applicants, the in.gredients team whittled it down to just four finalists.  Vote online or in-store (counts for more!) up to once per day until the 21st of October  We’ll announce the winner before our November First Friday Block Party! Find the mission statements and voting poll below:


Farmshare Austin envisions a future of resilient local food economies that provide farmers with livable incomes, value the resources needed to farm, and ensure organic food access. We take a whole-systems approach to community food security by educating and training future organic farmers and working with nonprofits in Central Texas to distribute produce to people in need.


Allies Against Slavery builds slave-free cities by mobilizing communities, supporting survivors, and catalyzing system transformation. We believe that only by bringing all sectors of society together can we reach our ultimate goal of making Austin a slave-free city – where traffickers can no longer exploit the vulnerable and where survivors can truly heal.


Urban Roots uses food and farming to transform the lives of young people and to inspire, engage, and nourish the community. Urban Roots provides paid internship opportunities to youth ages 14-17, to work on a 3.5 acre urban, sustainable farm in East Austin. These young people learn critical life and job skills, discover their capacity for leadership, and gain a sense of service and community.


PEAS (Partners for Education, Agriculture, and Sustainability) is dedicated to connecting communities to the natural world through edible education, school and community gardening maintenance, and outdoor learning in order to inspire the preservation and conservation of our precious planet.

Thanks for voting and good luck to the Finalists!

Written by Josh Blaine

October 9, 2015 at 7:59 pm

Father’s Day Gifts, Sunday Happy Hour, and Growler Special!

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Weekly Updates and Specials.
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With the threat of more flooding thankfully behind us (for now, at least), we can look forward to the weekend!  Come take advantage of our ever-popular deal on craft beer growler fills, and grab that Father’s Day gift for the local-loving dad in your life.  Not exactly sure what to get him? Grab an in.gredients gift card and let him have the fun!

This Week’s Deals

$2 Off Growler Fills
$10 Craft Beer, $15 Premium Beer

Hopper Crunch Paleo Granola

$7.99 (Save $2.00) Mediterranean Cucumbers

$1.99/lb (Save $0.80/lb)

Father’s Day Happy Hour

Sunday, 12pm-4pm

Special Events

Geeks Who Drink “Quiz For a Cause”

Thurs, June 18th, 7pm

This week’s quiz benefits the Boys and Girls Club of the Austin Area.  Come play, win prizes, and do good.

Austin Zero Food Waste Forum

Fri, June 19th, 8am-4pm

Sheraton Austin Hotel at the Capitol

We’re honored to be among the panel of experts discussing food waste prevention at this week’s Zero Food Waste Forum.  Registration is still open, plus walk-ups are welcome.  See you at the Sheraton!

Friday Night Porch Session with Juliette Buck

Friday, June 19th 7-9pm
Back for her first Porch Session in a while, this talented lady always puts on a great show. More info here.

Father’s Day Happy Hour with Real Ale Brewing

Sunday, June 21st 12-4pm
Looking for a nice way to celebrate Dad this weekend? Bring him by the shop for a Real Ale happy hour with a special cheese plate pairing. 

Fri, July 3rd: First Friday Block Party

Sat, July 4th: CLOSED

Weekly Recipe

Simple Fridge Pickles

Adapted from Kate Payne’s “Fridge Pickles 101


Serves: 4-5

  • 1 Qt Glass Jar
  • Veggies*
  • Coriander
  • Peppercorns
  • Garlic, Fresh
  • Fennel
  • Cloves
  • Cumin
  • 1 cu Vinegar
  • 1 c. Filtered Water
  • 1 tbs Salt
*Try Onion, Cucumber, Zuchini, Carrots, Jalapenos, Beets, etc*


  1. Wash & cut your veggies and pack tightly into your jar
  2. Add your favorite spices, fresh or dried
  3. Prepare a brine by combining vinegar, filtered water and salt in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil. Add sugar if you prefer a sweet pickle.
  4. Pour the brine over your veggies to cover and cap the lid.
  5. Place your jar in the back of the fridge for about a week before enjoying!

Vendor Spotlight

Kuhdoo Soaps

“We love what we do and don’t ever want to quit Kuhdoo’n it!” 

Kuhdoo Soap Co., pronounced Kuh-doo, comes from the spirit of a “we can do(o) it” attitude. A true family affair, the Mangums eat, breathe, and live soap (yes, their little one has actually eaten the soap).  This beautiful family hopes you love their soap as much as they love making it for you.  Be sure to check out some of their newest products, like candles, laundry soap, body butter, and a staff favorite, “Trail Boss” soap (smells like the Green Belt!).  
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
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Send us an email

Recurring Events

Geeks Who Drink Trivia

Every Thursday 7pm

Zumba with Rhonda

Every Saturday 10:30am

Storytime at in.gredients


Wine of the Week

Barton Springs Winery

2012 GSM

Coffee of the Month

Fara Coffee Espresso Roast

Wunder Monday

Kombucha Happy Hour

$1 Off Every Monday

Copyright 2015 in.gredients All rights reserved.

Store Hours:

Monday – Wednesday 9 am – 10 pm

Thursday – Saturday 9 am – 11 pm

Sunday 10 am – 10 pm

Happy Hour(s):

Monday-Friday 4-7pm

Contact Us:

2610 Manor Road, Austin TX 78722


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Our mission is to minimize waste and promote healthy, sustainable lifestyles by selling local food with pure ingredients.

Written by BigOlQuinn

June 17, 2015 at 11:05 am

Weekly Update and Specials :: Feb 3rd – 10th

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Weekly Updates from in.gredients Neighborhood Grocer

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This Friday is our first Block Party of 2015 and we’ve got quite the event lined up.  Tiny Pies and Wunder-Pilz will both be on site sampling out their superb products, Fifth Dimensions will be in the yard with their mobile book truck, and some of our favorite musicians – Ethan and Jeff, and Brand New Key – will be providing live musical entertainment.  Come enjoy all of this in the company of your favorite neighborhood friends to support the Literacy Coalition, our current community partner.  

Weekly Specials

This week we brought in a new artisanal pasta from the Houston area.  The folks at Tavola Pasta take great pride in their handmade process, which starts with organic semolina flour grown in North Dakota, and natural spring water.  Then they add local produce and extrude through bronze dies (rather than Teflon) before slowly air drying.  The result is a rich and flavorful pasta that will shine on its own or tossed with some Kitchen Pride “Baby Bellas” sautéed in a little bit of butter.  Get great deals on all of the above this week.  Bon appétit! 

Tavola Pasta, 1lb box: $5.89 ea (Save: $1.40 ea)

Tavola Pasta, bulk: $4.69/lb (Save: $1.00/lb)

Kitchen Pride Mushrooms: $2.99/lb (Save $1.00/lb)

This Week’s Produce

All non-local items are Certified Organic.
Local items come from farms with a commitment to sustainable practices.

Valentine’s Preview

With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, we’re making sure you know how to please your locavore lover this year.  Here’s a preview of just a few items we’ll be stocking this week and next.  Don’t forget our Game Night and Single’s Mixer on the 14th, too!


Geeks Who Drink Trivia

Thursday, Feburary 5th at 7pm

After a brief holiday hiatus, trivia is back!  Come compete with your friends and neighbors for some coveted prizes (including $25 and $10 store credit for first and second place, respectively).  This is a free and open event but please note that the content is not intended for children.   

First Friday Block Party

Friday, Feburary 6th at 5pm

Saturday Afternoon
Porch Session

w/ Rebecca Patek

Saturday, Feburary 7th at 1pm

Rebecca Patek is no stranger to our porch, but it has been a few months since we’ve had the honor of hosting this fiddle and guitar-playing country songstress.  Her unassuming stage presence belies her deep talent and passion for the music.
Upcoming Events
Every Thurs, 7pm: Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz
Fri, Feb 13th, 6pm: Live Music on the porch w/ Anthony Carson
Sat, Feb 14th, 1pm: Live Music on the Porch w/ Rebecca Patek
Sat, Feb 14th, 7-10pm: Singles Mixer and Game Night
Feb 18-22nd: OUTsider Festival 

Send us a message if you’d like to plan an event here – we’re a great spot to host your next happy hour, meeting, or birthday party.  

Cashew Milk Recipe

It’s pretty amazing what one cup of cashews can do! We’ve all heard of soy milk and almond milk, but have you ever heard of cashew milk? Here’s a super simple recipe that just might change your perspective on all nut milks.

Use this as a base in Thai food, soups, or even reduced to make a cream sauce.  Or just drink it straight! 

We love this recipe because it’s easy to make, easy to keep, and tastes deliciousWhen we say it’s easy, it’s kind of an understatement. Here’s your list of in.gredients:

1 cup Organic Raw Cashwes
2 oz of simple syrup (1:1 cane sugar & hot water)
3 cups filtered water


  1. Soak 1 cup of cashews in 3 cups of filtered water for about an hour (20 mins with hot water if you want to speed it up)
  2. Put cashews & water in a blender and blend on high until the chunks of cashews are finely ground (about 5 mins)
  3. Strain the liquid through a nut milk bag, cheese cloth or muslin bag (nut milk bag works best)
  4. Sweeten as desired (or leave unsweet if you want to cook with it)

If you prefer a thinner milk, add a little more water during the blending process. If a heavier milk is desired, reduce the water by about a 1/2 cup.

Promotions and News

Happy Hour(s)
$1 off pints/cans of beer and glasses of wine
$2 off pitchers and bombers

Mon-Fri 4-7pm

Mulled Wine Monday & Tea Pot Tuesday!

Get $1 OFF our mulled wine and pots of tea every Monday and Tuesday, respectively, and start your week off right.  

Wine of the Week: Duchman Winery 2012 Dolcetto

Native to the Piedmont region of Italy, Duchman’s Dolcetto is grown in the deep soil on the Texas High Plains. The Dolcetto grape is thick skinned and naturally tannic. Through very careful handling and neutral oak aging, Duchman Dolcetto is a pure expression of the grape and the vintage. Dark fruit and red plum notes along with well balanced acidity are hallmarks of this wine.

Copyright © 2015 in.gredients All rights reserved.

Store Hours:
Monday – Wednesday 9 am – 10 pm
Thursday – Saturday 9 am – 11 pm
Sunday 10 am – 10 pm

Happy Hour(s):
Monday-Friday 4-7pm

Contact Us:
2610 Manor Road, Austin TX 78722

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Written by Josh Blaine

February 3, 2015 at 7:08 pm

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