in.gredients

Choosing Organic May Help Honey Bees

with 3 comments

Do you like almonds? How ’bout blueberries? If so, here’s yet another reason to choose organic produce at the grocery store. It has to do with Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) – a mysterious syndrome that’s caused alarming numbers of honey bee colonies to spontaneously die or disappear, as if into thin air. Plants like almond trees and blueberries bushes (among countless others) propagate and reproduce by means of pollination, by “pollinators” such as the honey bee. For this reason, the survival of many of our favorite food crops depends on the survival of a healthy honey bee population.

CCD has puzzled experts lately, but new research points to the usage of pesticides in conventional farming practices as a potential culprit. This research article from Purdue University’s Department of Entomology highlights new discoveries of how honey bees have become exposed to certain pesticides and the adverse effects this exposure may have on them.

While more research is needed to understand exactly which chemicals are harming honey bees (and how), choosing to buy produce that hasn’t been treated with any chemical pesticides is a good precaution to take at this time to minimize the damage pesticides may have on honey bee populations. When it comes to the survival of pollinators (that facilitate the survival of crops that feed us!) it’s far better to be safe than sorry!

(image: Forest Wander)

3 Responses

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  1. I have bees AND blueberries (though unfortunately blueberries like tomatoes are self pollinating) but i also have piles of other flowers and organic veg.. and yes.. we can make a difference! c

    ceciliag

    January 21, 2012 at 7:45 pm

  2. […] Buy organic produce While more research is needed to understand exactly which chemicals are harming honey bees (and how), choosing to buy produce that hasn’t been treated with any chemical pesticides is a good precaution to take at this time to minimize the damage pesticides may have on honey bee populations. When it comes to the survival of pollinators (that facilitate the survival of crops that feed us!) it’s far better to be safe than sorry! (taken from in.gredients) […]

  3. http://www.pollinators.org will help you plant things to feed pollinators.

    Karen Scribner

    September 4, 2013 at 3:17 am


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