Posts Tagged ‘local


leave a comment »




in.gredients and Go Texan present a day of learning about local food, seasonal eating, and homesteading.  Meet experts in the field of agriculture, foraging, and seasonal cooking with hands-on activities and useful tips and tricks to leading a healthier and more sustainable lifestyle. Enjoy live music, free food, and community interactions while building stronger and more personal relationships with Austin’s finest local foodies.

Join us for special presentations and meet and greets with Cat Spring Tea, Texas Farmers Market, JBG Organics, Logro Farms, and Kate Payne’s Hip Girls Guide to Homemaking.

Schedule of Presentations, click on the links below to find out more information about each presenter.

10:30am – 11:00am:  Cat Spring Tea

11:15am – 12:00pm: Kate Payne’s Hip Girl’s Guide to Homemaking

12:15pm – 1:00pm: Logro Farms

1:15pm – 2:30pm: Solavore
 (times subject to change)


Written by kmfrabon

May 15, 2015 at 6:13 pm

Oatmeal Chocolate Mousse with Strawberries

leave a comment »


Photo by: Lisa @ Healthy Nibbles and Bits

The United States is the world’s largest producer of strawberries, accounting for 29% of global production according to AgMRC, and while our state may have some competition, Texas is definitely not lacking in strawberry pride. Spring is the onset of Texas strawberry season and small towns like Poteet have been supporting and creating a strawberry fan club since 1948, the first Poteet Strawberry Festival. Today, many small towns in and around Poteet are responsible for producing some of the most flavorful and sweet strawberries around, selling locally in order to preserve a fresh and flavorful taste.

Since we’re committed to seasonal eating and local sourcing, you’ll pretty much only find strawberries in our produce section when Texas strawberries are available, so you can imagine how exciting this season is for us.  We’ve been known to carry Poteet strawberries, but right now we’re very excited to be sourcing some delicious berries from Fruitful Hill Farm in Bastrop, TX.  This small family operation prides themselves in harvesting their berries mere days before delivery, and also chooses not to wash their berries, as this decreases their shelf life and deteriorates flavor.  Fruitful Hill Farm practices sustainable agriculture, utilizing organically approved pest control methods only when necessary.

Aside from pies, jams, and salads, a common trick to draw out a strawberry’s natural juices is to macerate your strawberries by adding a touch of sugar and setting aside for 10-15 minutes. If your mouth is already watering, try this overnight breakfast mousse listed on Food 52 and provided by Lisa @ Healthy Nibs and Bits.


⅓ cup oatmeal

⅓ cup unsweetened almond milk

½ cup yogurt

1 tablespoon cocoa powder

½ tablespoon chia seeds

1 teaspoon agave nectar or honey

jar or airtight container

*3 large strawberries, sliced


Except for your strawberries, mix together oatmeal, almond milk, yogurt, cocoa powder, chia seeds, and agave nectar or honey, adding more sweetener to your liking.

Place the mixture into ⅓ of your jar and top with sliced strawberries. Cover this layer with more of your oatmeal mixture and repeat with another layer until the jar is full.

Cover, refrigerate overnight and enjoy the next morning!

*For an additional burst of flavor, you can macerate your strawberries using brown sugar, balsamic vinegar, or balsamic reduction, setting aside before layering into your oatmeal, chocolate mousse.

Written by kmfrabon

May 4, 2015 at 12:00 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with , , , , ,

Garden Day Recap and Kale Smoothie Recipe

leave a comment »

FullSizeRenderThank you to everyone who came out on Sunday for our workday in celebration of our garden’s third anniversary. We repaired a number of our raised beds and planted two varieties of sweet potatoes.  Shout out to our friends at Joe’s OrganicsThird Coast Coffee, and Yard to Market Coop for providing the compost, coffee grounds and chaff, and soil, respectively.  Those sweet potatoes are going to be really happy!  Thanks as well to Dripping Springs Ollas for providing an olla for one of our other boxes.

With an abundance of kale in our garden right now, Farmer Sue recommended taking advantage of the final days of harvest with one of her favorite snacks, the kale smoothie.  After experimenting with kale from our garden and a few other signature ingredients sold in store, we created the Kale, Avocado, Ginger Smoothie!  For those of you who weren’t able to taste it on our porch yesterday, here’s the recipe so you can create the magic in your own kitchen.  Cheers!

Kale, Avocado, Ginger Smoothie


3 handfuls kaleIMG_0390

splash or two of almond milk

Two spoonfuls of White Mountain Organic Bulgarian Yogurt

Three tablespoons of Eden Organic Applesauce

½ an avocado

1-2 tablespoons of grated fresh ginger

1 teaspoon of lemon juice

1-2 tablespoons of honey

1-2 ice cubes

Wash your kale and cut off the stems, leaving only the leafy greens for blending. Place in a blender with the grated ginger, almond milk, yogurt, lemon juice, avocado, honey, and ice cubes and blend on high until the kale is completely blended into the smoothie.

Written by kmfrabon

April 20, 2015 at 10:59 am

Alice Waters and The Joys of Local Food

with one comment


Source: NPR

Today we are thankful for Alice Waters and local food. We’re in an exciting time where food is in the spotlight and people are realizing that local tastes better. This shift towards farm to table restaurants, grocery stores (woo hoo!) and food trailers is in part thanks to chef Alice Waters. Back in 1971, Waters decided (with no prior chef experience) to open a restaurant.

In an old house in Berkeley, CA, Waters opened the doors of Chez Panisse, and has been helping shape the local food movement ever since. Her inspiration came from studying abroad in Paris during the 1960s. As she traveled around the country, she realized that the best flavors came from what was made, grown and sourced from France.

Taking this idea of local food tasting better, Chez Panisse menu consists of simple, local food prepared with a lot of love. Since opening, the restaurant has grown and fostered relationships with growers in California. Using weekly trips to the farmers market as inspiration, the menu is shaped by what’s available and what’s in season. And while Waters acknowledges the challenges of eating local (where are the bananas?), she urges people to get creative, “Eating locally is so particular. You have to accept that fact and celebrate what does really grow.”

Waters has taken the idea of a local, sustainable diet and moved it from the restaurant into the classroom. Seventeen years ago, Waters teamed up with Neil Smith, a principal at Martin Luther King, Jr. Middle School to transform an acre of asphalt into an Edible Schoolyard. They then added in a kitchen element, and by year five, the teachers at this public middle school taught ten 90-minute classes a week in both the garden and the kitchen.  Since then, they’ve added chickens to the land, and now grow more than 100 varieties of seasonal vegetables, herbs, vines, berries, flowers and fruit trees. Best of all? They have served over 7,000 students. The work they are doing for the farm to school movement is huge, and if you’re seeking inspiration, go check out the multiple projects they’re working on to bring real, local food to the classroom.

Alice Waters is an inspiration. As a business whose ethos is to bring local, sustainable and seasonal food to our community, it’s not surprising that Waters was one of the main influencers for opening in.gredients. Last year at the Think Beyond Plastic award ceremony, one of our founders, Christian Lane, got the chance to meet Alice Waters. While discussing local food, Waters congratulated us on the work we’re doing, and encouraged the growth and expansion of in.gredients. To say we were flattered is an understatement. It’s not everyday you get kudos from a national local food leader.

When we look into the work of Alice Waters, our hope is restored. She’s living proof that with a lot of work, a lot of love and a strong passion and commitment to what you believe in, you can change the way people view and value their food. This Thanksgiving, raise your glass to individuals around the world who are bringing local back to the table.

Written by cscdavis

November 25, 2013 at 3:37 pm

The Diffusion of Innovation

leave a comment »

Today we are thankful for our early adopters. We are grateful to the folks who looked at our business model and mission statement and said to themselves, “Yes, this is something I believe in.” Whether this support came in the form of funding our Indiegogo campaign, helping us dig our garden beds or shopping here since day one, we are thankful for each and every one of you.

The founders of in.gredients took the conventional grocery store model and flipped it on its head. In a country where over 40% of our food goes to waste and so much unnecessary packaging fills the shelves, in.gredients exists as an alternative. We are a small grocery store that serves our community sustainable, seasonal and local food. We believe in our farmers, ranchers and artisans and think that our money should stay within our community. in.gredients isn’t about convenience. We are about innovation and shifting the way people shop and interact with their food. So today, we are thankful for all of those that believe in what we are doing.

In 1962 a man named Everett Rogers published a paper titled, “Diffusion of Innovations” This paper sought to explain how, why and at what rate new ideas and technology spreads through consumers. Shaped like a bell curve, this idea shows that there are a small number of early adopters, and these are the folks that catch wind of an innovative idea, acknowledge its purpose, and sign up. From there, more and more people catch on and eventually this idea becomes a part of everyday life.


Source: Alta Street

While a majority of the real life examples apply to technology (DVD players, Apple iPods, etc.), this is a theory that can be applied to any innovative idea. In Simon Sinek’s TED Talk, he asks the question why some leaders, businesses and organizations are so great at inspiring action and change. Referencing great leaders from our past, he suggests his Golden Circle idea. According to Sinek, every single person and organization knows what they do 100%, but very few people and organizations know why they do what they do. Not many organizations have pinpointed what their purpose is. Instead, they think from the outside in, first answering what, then how and finally why.

What makes inspiring innovators different, is that they answer the why first. They inspire by making believers out of their followers. As Sinek puts it, “The goal is not to do business with everybody who needs what you have. The goal is to do business with people who believe what you believe.” These believers, they are the early adopters. They are the ones that will dive head first into the business before anyone else. They are the people who funded us before we opened, volunteered countless hours to help us build the store from the ground up, and continue to shift with us as we grow and adapt our business.

Today, we are raising our glasses to our early adopters. The people who heard about in.gredients, saw that we were pioneering the idea of a zero-waste grocery store, accepted that it would be a work in progress, and have supported us ever since.

Thank you for believing in us, we wouldn’t be here without your continued support.

Written by cscdavis

November 23, 2013 at 2:11 pm

I’m in.

leave a comment »

Thanksgiving is a week away, and we have so much to be thankful for. We are honored to serve a community that values real, local food. We are inspired by all the people in our neighborhood who come together and make this place such a wonderful place to work. in.gredients wouldn’t be here without your support, so to kick off this week of giving thanks, we extend our gratitude to our customers.

A few of our regulars have captured our hearts. They are here almost every day, and have become a part of the in.gredients family. If you’ve visited the store, a few of these folks are probably familiar to you (Zippo is the unofficial store hound.) These are faces we adore, and we sat down them to find out why they are “in.”

Get to know your neighbors. Support local. Be a part of this amazing community!

I’m in.



Describe yourself in 3 words: easy-going, adventurous and fun

What’s your favorite part about the neighborhood? It has a little bit of everything, and you don’t have to walk far for it.

How did you hear about in.gredients? I lived across the street!

Why do you come back? I never left… haha. And all my friends are here.

What are you favorite things about in.gredients? It’s dog friendly, and I like the zero-waste idea. I also love the familiar environment.

If you were to describe in.gredients in one word, what would it be? Pleasant.

Last but not least, if you were a fruit or a vegetable, what would you be? I’d be a kiwi… a hard exterior with a sweet inside.



Describe yourself in 3 words: new, music, experiences

What’s your favorite part about the neighborhood? Without a doubt, it’s the community, the people and the neighbors.

How did you hear about in.gredients? I watched it get built and then came on over.

Why do you come back? The staff! They are the nicest. in.gredients exceeded my expectations, the store has so much more stuff than I initially thought it would have. I do almost all of my grocery shopping here, it has everything I need.

What are you favorite things about in.gredients? It gives our neighbors a place to be. It’s our pub, our grocery store and our play house, all in one place.

If you were to describe in.gredients in one word, what would it be? Tasty

Last but not least, if you were a fruit or a vegetable, what would you be? I’d be a green bell pepper because I can go with anything!



Describe yourself in 3 words: funny, smart & lazy

What’s your favorite part about the neighborhood? The people

How did you hear about in.gredients? I moved in across the street right before you opened.

Why do you come back? I like it here. It’s full of good people and fun.

What are you favorite things about in.gredients? The prepared foods, the events and the selection.

If you were to describe in.gredients in one word, what would it be? Community

Last but not least, if you were a fruit or vegetable, what would you be? An avocado. It’s delicious and green is my favorite color!



Describe yourself in 3 words: crazy, cat, lady

What’s your favorite part about the neighborhood? My neighbors

How did you hear about in.gredients? I moved in right next door.

Why do you come back? The staff. Everyone is encouraging about healthy food, and don’t make you feel stupid if you don’t know something. They aren’t patronizing or intimidating.

What are you favorite things about in.gredients? It’s a great place to hang out. My friends and community are here.

If you were to describe in.gredients in one word, what would it be? Family

Last but not least, if you were a fruit or vegetable, what would you be? Cheese doesn’t count as a vegetable?



Describe yourself in 3 words: charming, gentle and sweet

What’s your favorite part about the neighborhood? All the people and dogs!

How did you hear about in.gredients? Jake told me.

Why do you come back? To visit my pals.

What are you favorite things about in.gredients? The events.

If you were to describe in.gredients in one word, what would it be? Friendly

Last but not least, if you were a fruit or vegetable, what would you be? A pear… I’m soft and sweet.


Written by cscdavis

November 21, 2013 at 2:22 pm

Posted in Community

Tagged with , , , ,

Zero Waste Delivery with Vital Farms

leave a comment »

We set a lofty goal when we embarked on our zero waste mission. Luckily, we work with amazing local farmers, ranchers and artisans who share in our vision. We realize our vendors are up to their eyeballs in work, and are so grateful when they take the extra steps to help us reduce waste.

Today we received our first shipment of Vital Farms eggs in reusable containers. In the past, we’ve received them in cardboard boxes and egg cartons. While these were collected and given back, we knew we could improve the system. Now, with the help of Vital Farms, we’re getting our eggs delivered in milk crates and reusable plastic egg cartons. Each week we will wash and store these crates and cartons, and return them with our weekly delivery. It’s a pretty neat system, if we do say so ourselves.

photo 1 (3)photo 2 (2)

We owe a big thank you to Vital Farm founders Matt and Catherine, who met one of our managers a few weeks ago and turned around as a zero-waste delivery partner within days of hearing our idea. Vital Farms, founded in 2007, started out on a 10 acre piece of land south-east of Austin. They now work with small family farms from California to Georgia in order to produce pastured eggs year-round.

Vital Farms cares about their chickens. With fields full of grass, legumes and insects available to the birds, plus certified organic Coyote Creek feed to supplement their wild diet, plenty of outdoor space and a nighttime shelter with clean nesting boxes, these chickens are well taken care of. The founders have gone to great lengths to make sure each of their farms meet this high standard, sometimes requiring 6 or more farm visits per year.

We’re happy to support Vital Farms, and can’t wait to see how our next zero-waste endeavor goes.

Written by cscdavis

November 8, 2013 at 10:10 am


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 14,114 other followers

%d bloggers like this: