in.gredients

Posts Tagged ‘grocery shopping

The Zero Waste Home

with 2 comments

The Johnson family share their zero waste lifestyle in this inspiring video:

CLICK !

After Bea and Scott Johnson downsized from a 3,000 sq ft to 1,400 sq ft house, they began to declutter and simplify their lifestyle. As Bea researched more about zero waste, she completely transformed her family’s home. They realized their “refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle” mentality was both budget-friendly and healthier than their previous lifestyle. We love their compostable toothbrush and homemade toothpaste!

In their blog you can also find a zero-waste grocery shopping guide and if you’re weighing the pros and cons of this lifestyle, here is Bea’s list.

(Images via: The Zero Waste Home)

Written by kbrotherslane

June 28, 2011 at 12:25 pm

Is in.gredients More Expensive than the Supermarket?

leave a comment »

If organic foods don’t contain any additives or processing, shouldn’t they be cheaper than foods that do? It makes sense at first glance. But the answer is actually “no” for a few reasons.

Highly-processed, chemically-treated foods are cheaper because you’re paying for them with your taxes. After World War II, the US government (and other European governments) needed to ensure that the severe food shortages experienced during the war didn’t happen again – and began to heavily subsidize agro­chemical (generic for farm chemicals and preservatives) agriculture with tax dollars to promote mass food production. Common agrochemicals include such corn-based preservatives as dextrose, maltodextrin, high fructose corn syrup, and absorbic acid. The subsidies worked. Argochemicals weren’t designed to be nutritious or tasty, but rather to boost production as cheaply as possible. So while chemically-fueled food products are cheaper, they also lack in quality.

Organic farmers don’t receive any subsidies from the government, so they have to charge more for their product to stay profitable. Since their foods are of better quality than non-organic products, the higher cost is justifiable to the consumer – though frustrating since we don’t typically think of food as something to spend extra money on. Still, eating healthily is important, and eating organic and natural foods is legitimately better for you than eating the alternative. And that’s more expensive. But in.gredients offers an alternative shopping method that lowers your barrier of entry into healthy grocery shopping: ultimate portion control.

Portion control isn’t just healthier. It’s more affordable. In typical supermarkets, you don’t have control over how much you buy outside of the deli and produce sections of the store. Most food is pre-packaged, so the amount and cost is determined for you. In this system you can’t always guarantee you’re buying exactly what you plan to use. If you need 1/4lb of granola, for example, you may have to resort to buying 1lb of it for a higher cost. If you need 3 cups of curry powder, you may have to buy 4 small containers of it to have enough. In these scenarios, you’re not only spending more for what you need – you’re generating more food and packaging waste. Were the 4 small containers really necessary? And what about all that extra granola?

Having control over how much you buy helps you spend less, reduce waste, and make your grocery shopping more efficient. That’s why our shopping model is so appealing. We want our customers to have affordable access to good food, so selling everything in bulk lets our shoppers choose exactly how much they spend while reducing their waste production.

Consumerism doesn’t fit at in.gredients. While we’re a for-profit business, we’re not selling our shelves to companies after exponential-volume sales. We’re out to prove that a for-profit grocery store can make organic more affordable, make local food more accessible, and make waste reduction more practical – and make your dollars good dollars by giving a portion of our revenue to local community programs.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 14,036 other followers

%d bloggers like this: