in.gredients

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Thanksgiving Recipes and Specials

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Weekly Updates from in.gredients Neighborhood Grocer

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Giving Thanks

Y’all know what we’re grateful for this season? You guessed it: local food, grown sustainably!  And folks like yourself who choose to shop with us or at farmers markets because you know that good food is worth a little extra.  Why not make your Thanksgiving table as local as possible this year?  In this special edition newsletter, we give you all kinds of reasons to come check out what we have in stock. Offer your guests or hosts something unique this holiday and they’ll surely be grateful. 

Recipes

We’ve all got our favorite Thanksgiving recipes but here are a few to help fill the holes.  And to make these recipes even easier, we’ve created some in.store bundles, including recipe cards and deals.  Come in and see for yourself!

Hearty Autumn Stew (GF/V)

This soup is almost your entire Thanksgiving meal in a bowl.  Packed full of hearty seasonal greens and root vegetables, it’s a great way to please everyone at your table.  Consider serving this as a side at the big meal as a vegan option, or add leftover turkey the next day and enjoy over the weekend. Not quite ready to commit?  Come in and try a bowl – it’s our Soup of the Week!

in.gredients

  • 1 bunch kale
  • 1 lb red potatoes (diced)
  • 1 1/2 lb sweet potatoes (diced)
  • 1/2 lb carrots (diced)
  • 2 cups garbanzo beans, pre-soaked (cover w/ water and let sit overnight)
  • 2 limes 
  • 1 bunch shallots (chopped)
  • 2 Tbs sesame oil
  • 10-12 cups water or veggie broth (or add 2 Tbs Better Than Bouillon to water)
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tsp smoked paprika
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 tsp fine sea salt
  • 1 Tbs ground black pepper

Directions

  1. Heat sesame oil in a large stock pot and add shallots, sautéing until golden brown.
  2. Add chopped garlic along with all the spices.  
  3. Add chopped potatoes, sweet potatoes, and carrots.  Mix thoroughly.  
  4. Add pre-soaked garbanzo beans, water/bouillon/broth, and bay leaves.  
  5. Bring pot to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cover for 20 mins, stirring occasionally.
  6. Once potatoes are soft, mix in kale and cook just until soft (retaining it’s bright green color)
  7. Serve with a hearty sourdough or multigrain bread.  

Ginger-Apple Pumpkin Soup by Love and Lemons

When we’re wondering what to cook up for dinner on a given night or how to spice up a weekend potluck, we often turn to one of the many wonderful food bloggers here in Austin.  This recipe comes from the Austin Chronicle’s 2013 Top Food Blogger, Love and Lemons. Get 10% off the bundle if you purchase all the ingredients pictured to the right!    

in.gredients

  • 1 medium pumpkin or butternut squash
  • 1 small apple (or 1/2 a large one)
  • 1 medium yellow onion
  • drizzle of olive oil, salt and pepper (for roasting)
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1 can coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger
  • 1/4-1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne (or to taste)
  • 1 teaspoon additional salt (or to taste)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F
  2. Roast pumpkin/squash – cut in half and scoop out insides (save and toast seeds!).  Drizzle with olive oil, salt/pepper, and roast cut side up for 20 minutes, flip and roast cut side down for another 20 or so minutes, or until the flesh is soft.  Remove from oven and let cool, then peel the skin away from flesh. 
  3. While the squash roasts, slice the apple and onion into wedges and arrange on a baking sheet.  Drizzle with olive oil, salt/pepper, and roast for 20 minutes or until the edges turn golden brown.  During hte last 10 minutes or so, add the whole garlic cloves to the baking sheet.  
  4. In a blender, add pumpkin mash, roasted onion, apple, garlic (remove skins), coconut milk, ginger, cardamom, cayenne and salt.  Puree until smooth.  If too thick, add a bit of water or broth to thin and blend again.  
  5. Taste and adjust seasonings to your liking!  

Candied Sweet Potatoes (V)

This vegan twist on a Thanksgiving classic is a must for many people, and now that we’ve got vegan marshmallows in stock, you can make sure no one at your table has to miss out.  Add a little bourbon or rum to give some punch to this one!  

in.gredients

  • 4 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp maple syrup
  • 5 Tbs Earth Balance Butter spread
  • 2 cups mini vegan marshmallows
  • 1/2 cup chopped raw pecans
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon fresh ground ginger

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.  Add sweet potatoes to a 13x9x2 glass baking dish. 
  2. Combine sugar, maple syrup, Earth Balance, cinnamon, salt, nutmeg and ginger in a small saucepan and cook gently until all ingredients are combined.  
  3. Pour warm mixture over sweet potatoes and toss to coat evenly.  Cover dish with foil.
  4. Bake sweet potatoes for 50 minutes.  Uncover and bake until potatoes are tender and browned.  
  5. Raise temperature to 500 degrees F and top with marshmallows and pecans.  
  6. Bake for about 3 minutes, or until marshmallows and nuts start to brown.  

We’ve got what you need!

Tips for a Green Thanksgiving  

Have a waste management plan!
If you’re hosting a lot of family or friends and you don’t have enough dish ware, consider using compostable plates (yes, you can get ‘em here) instead of plastic or coated paper.  Of course, this means you’ll need to be composting.  Don’t have space or want to bother? Check out our zero waste friends, the Compost Pedallers for help.  
Grow Your Own Food
Okay, maybe it’s a little late to start growing your own food for this Thanksgiving, but consider starting a garden this season and perhaps by next Thanksgiving you’ll be harvesting your own herbs, greens, and root vegetables for the big meal. Need help? Ask YardFarm – they’re experts!
Buy Direct from Farmers
Seek out your nearest farmers market to get produce, meats, and cheese directly from the producers.  Not sure where to go? Try SFCTexas Farmers Markets, or HOPE Farmers Market.  Be sure to tell them we say hello!

 

REMINDER

We’ll be closed Thursday AND Friday of next week! 

Support Local 

In addition to a few choice items on sale through Wednesday, we’ve also got some special deals on wine, cheese plates, recipe bundles, and a delicious new Texas product made with vinegar, drinking shrubs! 

Recipe Bundles: Purchase a featured recipe bundle and save 10% on all the in.gredients!

Wine Special: Buy Any 2 Bottles of Wine and Get 50% OFF a Cin Cin Wine Bottle Carrier (holds up to 6 bottles)

Holiday Cheese Plate: $24.99 for a Selection of Cheeses

Shrub Special: Free lemon w/ a Shrub Purchase

Organic Valley Cultured Butter: $6.69 ea (Save $0.30 ea)

Local Sweet Potatoes: $2.09/lb (Save $0.36/lb)

Stahlbush Frozen Cranberries: $4.31 ea (Save $0.48 ea)

Copyright © 2014 in.gredients All rights reserved.

Store Hours:
Monday – Wednesday 9 am – 10 pm
Thursday – Saturday 9 am – 11 pm
Sunday 10 am – 10 pm

Happy Hour(s):
Monday-Friday 4-7pm

Contact Us:
2610 Manor Road, Austin TX 78722
512-275-6357

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Written by Josh Blaine

November 21, 2014 at 11:22 pm

Pioneering the Possible

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Our ambitious ethos has garnered quite a bit of attention since our IndieGoGo campaign launched us into the public spotlight just about three years ago.  People from across the globe applauded our efforts to reduce food-related waste in the grocery industry by pioneering a “package free” model.  It’s been almost two years of holding close to our original, idealistic vision of a different kind of grocery store, and though the response from the community – near and far – has remained positive and supportive, the numbers from our first 21 months of business paint a different picture than we had hoped.

Rather than give up and lament the impossibility of a perfect package free grocery model, we are narrowing our focus to three things we know we do well: zero wastelocal food, and community.  As a result, we hope to remain a part of the sustainable food movement, a part of this vibrant and growing city, and a part of this dynamic, diverse community on Manor Road.  We plan to bend so as not to break, pivot to not fall, and innovate towards what’s pioneering but not impossible.

In practice, this shift means discontinuing a portion of our bulk section to make room for some new offerings.  Our updated guiding principles look like this:

Zero waste: We average less landfill waste per month than an American averages per day! 

Local food: As a hub for quality local products, we champion small farms and producers and promote local, seasonal eating.  Some might say we have farmers market offerings with grocery store hours.

Community: Community gatherings – formal and informal, educational and social – are a regular happening around here.  Plus, we love to partner with and support like-minded businesses and organizations that are also committed to a greener, more just world.

Still have some questions? Check out our updated FAQ page.  We hope you’ll rally behind us as we make these changes and help us stick around for the duration.

Humbly,

The in.gredients Team

 

Written by Josh Blaine

May 3, 2014 at 5:23 pm

Erica’s Bug Sauce

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Last night we were lucky enough to play host to a crowd of intelligent, motivated, and committed environmentalists with one thing in common: a dedication to the human consumption of bugs. Recently we published a blog post explaining why we are jumping into the world of entomophagy (pun intended). Last night’s inspired and informed guests, curious (and pleasantly surprised!) first-time bug-eaters, and general spirit of collaboration and optimism, affirmed our commitment to this growing movement.

In the buzz of last night’s event preparation, Harman from World Ento turned to in.gredients for a simple teriyaki sauce to use in his cricket cooking demo. Erica, a veteran team member and the creative force behind our weekly salads (among other things), sprang into action and pulled together this impromptu “bug sauce.” To say the crowd was impressed and pleased with the results is an understatement.

Well, here’s the recipe, by popular demand!

Erica’s “Bug Sauce”  IMG_20140218_192824_569

in.gredients

  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup tamari
  • 2 tsp ground giner
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp coriander
  • 1/2 tsp dried cilantro
  • 1/2 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp chili flakes
  • 2 tsp turbinado sugar
  • 1/2 cup sesame oil

 

Preparation

  1. Combine all the ingredients except the oil
  2. Drizzle the sesame oil into the mixture while whisking to emulsify.
  3. Enjoy! On crickets, a salad, chicken, or stir-fry!

Written by Josh Blaine

February 19, 2014 at 6:56 pm

Weekly Specials and Update :: February 12th – February 18th

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Weekly Updates from in.gredients Neighborhood Grocer

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Meet the crew from our third “Go Texan, Go Local Culinary Workshop” with Traveling Recipes.  What an inspiring evening we shared on Sunday at the Sustainable Food Center kitchen, where we cooked up six delectable plant-based dishes focusing on seasonal and local ingredients. It’s what building a better local food system is all about.  Find one of the recipes – Beet this Quinoa – featured below.  

New Community Partner  - Accepting Applications!

It’s almost time to choose our next community partner!  That means now is a great time to nominate your favorite Austin non-profits.  Click the button below to start raising more money and awareness for your favorite ATX cause.    

Community Partner Application

Weekly Specials:

This week it’s all about romance (of course).  From adorable handmade brooches and beautiful pressed cards, to the rich and decadent Kiskadee drinking chocolate, we’ve got plenty of tasteful gifts for everyone.

Little Low Valentine’s Cards: $3.50 ea (Save $1.00)

Dear Today Wooden Brooches : $13.00 ea (Save $3.00)

Sir Richards Condoms: 10% off all packs

 

Kiskadee Drinking Chocolate: $8.99/lb (Save $1.00/lb)

 

Great Bean Chocolate Bars : $5.95 ea (Save $1.00)

Events:

Last night’s Wine and Cheese Event was postponed due to weather (if we had a nickel for every time that’s been said this month).  See below for the new date.  

Send us a message if you’d like to plan an event here – we’re a great spot to host your next happy hour, meeting, or birthday celebration.  

Geeks Who Drink Trivia

Thursday, February 13th at 7pm

After a long hiatus (made longer by last week’s weather delay), Geeks Who Drink Trivia returns to Manor Road!  Come compete with your neighbors for some coveted prizes.  This is a free and open event but please note that the content is not intended for children.   

Valentine’s Day Singles Mixer and Game Night
Friday, February 14th at 6:30pm
We had so much fun last year, we had to do it again. With Tiny Pies, Lick Ice Cream, ChocoSutra, and id Soda all represented, you’ll be too happy not to fall in love – we promise.  

Wine and Cheese Tasting
Tuesday, February 25th, 6:30pm
Once again rescheduled due to weather, we’re determined to bring you delicious pairings of Antonelli’s Cheese, La Villa Ranch sausage, and Pedernales Cellars wine.  These pairings will blow your palates away – believe us.  Updates and details here

Little Herds Pre-Party and World Ento Product Launch
Tuesday, February 18th, 6:30pm
When it comes to old ideas resurfacing to solve new problems – i.e. removing unnecessary food packaging – you know we’re in.  And that’s why we’re getting into another new, old idea: eating insects.  Read our full blog post here, attend our launch party next week, or get tickets for the main event here.

Promotions and News:

Partner Spotlight: SafePlace

We believe in supporting our community.  That’s why we donate 5 cents for every container you bring to in.gredients to reuse.  Our current partner is SafePlace, a non-profit dedicated to ending domestic abuse and violence.  Practice zero waste with us and support our community partner!

Recipe of the Week

Beet this Quinoa

We’re still giddy from the energy and excitement of our recent Go Texan, Go Local Culinary Workshop.  Fifteen of us from the community came together to share six inspired recipes from the creative wellspring that is Andi Jo at Traveling Recipes.  This one was one of our favorites.   Enjoy!

Adapted from Traveling Recipes

Ingredients:

  • 2 beets-quartered, boiled & blended
  • ½ c apple cider vinegar
  • 4 cups quinoa, rinsed
  • 7 ¾ cups water
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 apple, diced
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 3 carrots, diced
  • 1 sprig rosemary, de-stemmed & chopped
  • 1 ½ cups pecans
  • 1 tbs Outer Spice Spicy Blend
  • Pinch salt and cracked pepper

Procedure: 

  1. Rinse quinoa and place in pot with OuterSpice and water. Bring to boil, cover, reduce to simmer and cook for 11~13 minutes.
  2. Place beets in small pot, cover with HOT water and boil until tender (10-15). Remove and drain. Place in blender with 3 tbs of water and blend. Set aside.
  3. While cooking, prep all veggies and the apple.  Place onions in a hot pan and caramelize. (To caramelize, heat pan on high, add onions and allow to brown while stirring. Once all are browned, add a splash of water, stir and repeat for 4 minutes.) Add carrots & garlic after 4 minutes and continue to cook for 5 more minutes. Turn off heat.
  4. When quinoa is ready add sauteed veggies, beet mix, vinegar, pecans and remaining ingredients. Mix thoroughly until all is PINK! Season to taste.
  5. Place in serving bowl and make art! Be creative!!
 

Copyright © 2013 in.gredients All rights reserved.

Hours:
Monday thru Saturday 9 am – 10 pm
Sunday 10 am – 10 pm

Happy Hour(s):
Monday-Friday 4-7 pm

Contact Us:
2610 Manor Road, Austin TX 78722
512-275-6357

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Written by Josh Blaine

February 12, 2014 at 12:53 pm

A Complete(ly) Sustainable Protein?

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We’re all about new ideas.

We’re also into revitalizing old ideas that have gone by the wayside. Eliminating unnecessary food packaging and focusing on locally and sustainably grown foods are good examples of old ideas made new again, and so is this: eating insects.  Entomophagy, as it’s formally known, is a practice dating back thousands of years.  Today, however, Western cultures hardly know the first thing about eating bugs, even though many other culinary traditions (Mexico, Thailand, and China, to name a few) still consume insects with regularity.  As far as we’re concerned, insects are overdue for a resurgence in the West, and we’re not the only ones who think so.

Cricket!Since 2010 when the idea of in.gredients was born, entomophagy has been on our list of creative solutions to environmental and social problems. Only recently, however, did we  connect with two groups here in Austin leading the way in edible insects.  World Ento, founded in Georgia in 2010 and recently re-located to Austin, is setting industry standards for safe, sustainably-raised insects.  Little Herds, an Austin non-profit in its final days of a crowd-funding campaign, is on a mission to educate the public about the merits and joys of eating insects.

What are those merits, you ask? Insects are a highly efficient and nutritious source of protein (complete with all 9 essential amino acids), which makes insects far more viable in a resource-limited future than traditional sources.  To give some context, the resources required to raise one pound of beef can raise nine pounds of crickets.  That’s a significant difference, and one we simply can’t afford to ignore as population growth and resource depletion continue.

So how does one eat insects?  Well, with over 2,000 edible species, the options are almost endless.  Chefs from all over the States, including Austin’s own Sonya Cote, are already incorporating insects into their menus.  Not excited about a whole cricket on the end of your fork?  That’s fine, World Ento makes both cricket and mealworm flours that incorporate safely prepared insect meal into white or whole wheat flour.  From there, the possibilities range from chocolate chip cookies, to pancakes, to just about any recipe involving flour.  It’s a simple way to add a healthy, sustainable protein, and the insect flavor and texture are hardly detectable.

World Ento raises and sells clean, safe-to-eat, and ethically harvested insects (Good Karma Killing, as World Ento calls it, is a freezing process that lulls them into a painless stasis), and soon you’ll be able to find them (as a Chocolate “Chirp” Cookie Mix) at in.gredients!

Want to learn more?  Follow World Ento and Little Herds on Twitter, and come out to our pre-party (for this amazing event) next Tuesday, February 18th.  We’ll have tons of samples and a few of the big names in entomophagy on hand to talk to you in person about this exciting movement.  Hop on board – you won’t want to miss this one.

Written by Josh Blaine

February 12, 2014 at 10:37 am

Healthy Meals & Snacks for Your Next Trip

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havefoodtravel

Let’s be honest, there’s nothing good about airport food. We’ve all been there, pacing around the airport looking for options that aren’t full of salt, sugar and fat. Seeing as summer is upon us, it only makes sense to provide a go-to list for healthy travel. We found a majority of these tips from My New Roots, a great source for whole foods and healthy living advice. Follow these tips and you’ll be a happy camper when you skip past the $15 sandwich and avoid the inevitable regret that results in spending and eating over priced airport food.

According to Sarah, there’ll be some prep work involved, but it’s worth it. Whether you’re on the plane for just a few hours, going on a transcontinental trip or have an epic road trip in mind, these tips and snacks will carry you through.

Tips on Traveling with Food:

  • Pack foods that don’t need to be refrigerated: This is a pretty obvious tip, but just in case you were wondering, leave the meat, cheese and dairy at home.
  • Pack foods that will maintain food texture: Think carrots, cucumbers, bell peppers, apples, and granola. If you want to pack greens, stick with romaine. It turns out that spinach and other lettuces wilt and get soggy.
  • Pack foods that are easy to eat: Avoid being the person on the plane that ends up smearing sandwich drippings across the tray table. Stick with low-mess fruits, vegetables and snacks.
  • Be considerate: Stick to foods that don’t have too strong of a scent. We’ve all been in the plane next to the person who decides to bring McDonalds on board. Be thoughtful of your neighbors, you’re in a VERY small space, remember?
  • Avoid liquids: Remember how you can’t bring liquids onto planes anymore? This all depends on the security team, but packing hummus in with carrot sticks will most likely be allowed. If the thought of getting your hummus tossed out makes you anxious, stick to zero-liquid foods.
  • Drink lots of water: Another no brainer, but remember that flying dries you out and our bodies will get bloated and feel funky unless you stay well hydrated.

Snacks and Meals for Flying:

From My New Roots

From the Kitchn

From Sprouted Kitchen

Cookie & Kate

Happy flying!

Written by cscdavis

June 20, 2013 at 9:00 am

Farmer Spotlight :: Urban Roots

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When you find yourself at Urban Roots, you’ll never want to leave. Only a few miles from downtown Austin, this piece of land used to be called Oasis Gardens Farm, and we understand why. Not only does this farm produce incredible vegetables (if you haven’t had an Urban Roots beet yet, you’re missing out) they’re also a non-profit teaching teens leadership and farming skills while providing access to healthy food in Austin.

urbanrootssign

Yep, this is what an oasis looks like.

Urban Roots was founded in 2007 as a program of YouthLaunch, and started the process of becoming an independent non-profit agency in the fall of 2011. Each year, the farm sets the goal of growing 30,000 pounds of produce with 40% of it going to local soup kitchens and food pantries. For 25 weeks during the spring and summer, Urban Roots provides paid internships to Austin youth, who develop life and job skills while growing food for the Austin community. The interns get to know this 3.5 acre plot of land, getting their hands dirty and learning what it takes to grow a tomato.

tomatoes

With open volunteer days Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 8-12 and some select Saturdays, there are plenty of opportunities to go check out the farm. After spending a volunteer day harvesting carrots, I was reminded how much work goes into growing food and how much joy can be found in getting outside and getting involved.

carrots

While on the farm, I had the pleasure of talking with Blake Hill, Urban Roots farm manager, and Meg Mattingly, the Farm Education Specialist. As we chatted amongst the tomato plants, it became clear that while they love farming, this place, and their work, is for the youth. “The most important thing Urban Roots does is serve these teens. It gives them skills that they can carry with them for the rest of their life,” Mattingly said.

blakemeg

During their most recent open house, I had the honor of hearing from four of their youth interns. It was inspiring to listen to these young people talk about the impact Urban Roots has had on their lives. They spoke of the opportunities this organization provides, how they never thought they’d be good at public speaking, and how much confidence they’ve gained from their internship. “Out here, these kids learn to be the best versions of themselves,” Hill said.

While food insecurity, obesity and hunger rates are on the rise, Urban Roots is a breath of fresh air. Check it out for yourselves, you’ll leave the farm a better, more inspired person… We promise.

cabbage

Urban Roots is doing important work in our community, if you have any money to spare, consider donating. You can also follow them on Facebook and Twitter.

Written by cscdavis

May 22, 2013 at 4:22 pm

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